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الموضوع: متى نستخدم So

  1. #1
    طالب مبتدئ
    تاريخ التسجيل
    Jul 2008
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    Help متى نستخدم So

    من فضلك:
    متى نستخدم So
    قبل الصفة
    مثال:
    It was ...........hot that no one got out of the swimming pool.
    1-such
    2-such a
    3-so
    4-a such
    5-very
    ما الجواب الصحيح و لماذا
    و شكراُ

  • #2
    Super Teacher الصورة الرمزية TigerShark
    تاريخ التسجيل
    Mar 2008
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    Thumbs up This is the answer

    اقتباس المشاركة الأصلية كتبت بواسطة هنودة مشاهدة المشاركة
    من فضلك:
    متى نستخدم So
    قبل الصفة
    مثال:
    It was ......so.....hot that no one got out of the swimming pool.
    1-such
    2-such a
    3-so
    4-a such
    5-very
    ما الجواب الصحيح و لماذا

    و شكراُ

    واليك يا اخى شرح القاعدة بالتفصيل والفرق بين

    So and Such

    So + Adjective



    USE



    "So" can be combined with adjectives to show extremes. This form is often used in exclamations.

    Examples:

    • The music is so loud! I wish they would turn it down.
    • The meal was so good! It was worth the money.

    USE with "That"


    The above form can be combined with "that" to show extremes which lead to certain results. The "that" is usually optional.

    Examples:

    • The music is so loud that I can't sleep.
    • The music is so loud I can't sleep.

    • The meal was so good that we decided to have dinner at the same restaurant again tonight.
    The meal was so good we decided to have dinner at the same restaurant again tonight.

    So + Adverb

    USE


    "So" can be combined with adverbs to show extreme actions. This form is often used in exclamations.
    Examples:

    • She spoke so quickly! She sounded like an auctioneer.
    • He paints so well! I am sure he is going to become a famous artist.


    USE with "That"



    The above form can be combined with "that" to show extreme actions which lead to certain results. The "that" is usually optional.

    Examples:

    • She spoke so quickly that I couldn't understand her.
    • She spoke so quickly I couldn't understand her.

    • He paints so well that they offered him a scholarship at an art school in Paris.
    He paints so well they offered him a scholarship at an art school in Paris.

    So + Many / Few + Plural Noun

    USE


    "So" can be combined with "many" or "few" plus a plural noun to show extremes in amount. This form is often used in exclamations.
    Examples:

    • I never knew you had so many brothers!
    • She has so few friends! It's really quite sad.

    USE with "That"


    The above form can be combined with "that" to show extremes in amount which lead to certain results. The "that" is usually optional.

    Examples:

    • I never knew you had so many brothers that you had to share a bedroom.
    • I never knew you had so many brothers you had to share a bedroom.

    • She has so few friends that she rarely gets out of the house.
    She has so few friends she rarely gets out of the house.

    So + Much / Little + Non-countable Noun

    USE


    "So" can be combined with "much" or "little" plus a non-countable noun to show extremes in amount. This form is often used in exclamations.
    Examples:

    • Jake earns so much money! And he still has trouble paying the rent.
    • They have so little food! We need to do something to help them.


    USE with "That"



    The above form can be combined with "that" to show extremes in amount which lead to certain results. The "that" is usually optional.

    Examples:

    • Jake earns so much money that he has lost all sense of what a dollar is worth.
    • Jake earns so much money he has lost all sense of what a dollar is worth.

    • They have so little food that they are starving to death.
    They have so little food they are starving to death.

    So + Much / Little / Often / Rarely

    USE


    "So" can be combined with words like "much," "little," "often," or "rarely" to describe how much or how often someone does an action. This form is often used in exclamations.
    Examples:

    • Earl drinks so much! It's not good for his health.
    • My sister visits us so rarely! I really miss her.


    USE with "That"



    The above form can be combined with "that" to show the results of extreme actions. The "that" is usually optional.

    Examples:

    • Earl drinks so much that it is starting to interfere with his work.
    • Earl drinks so much it is starting to interfere with his work.

    • My sister visits us so rarely that my kids wouldn't even recognize her.
    My sister visits us so rarely my kids wouldn't even recognize her.

    Such + Adjective + Noun

    USE


    "Such" can be combined with an adjective and a noun to show extremes. This form is often used in exclamations.
    Examples:

    • Don has such a big house! I think it's a little ridiculous.
    • Shelly has such beautiful eyes! I have never seen that shade of blue before.


    USE with "That"



    The above form can be combined with "that" to show extremes which lead to certain results. The "that" is usually optional.

    Examples:

    • Don has such a big house that I actually got lost on the way to the bathroom.
    • Don has such a big house I actually got lost on the way to the bathroom.

    • Shelly has such beautiful eyes that she got a job as a make-up model.
    Shelly has such beautiful eyes she got a job as a make-up model.

    NOTE


    Remember that without the noun you need to use "so."
    Examples:

    • such beautiful eyes that
    • so beautiful that

    Such + Judgemental Noun

    USE


    "Such" can also be combined with judgemental nouns for emphasis. This form is often used in exclamations.

    Examples:

    • He is such an idiot! He says the stupidest things.
    • She is such a genius! We could never do this work without her.



    USE with "That"


    The above form can be combined with "that" to show certain results. The "that" is usually optional.

    Examples:

    • He is such an idiot that nobody would hire him.
    • He is such an idiot nobody would hire him.

    • She is such a genius that they immediately gave her a position at the university.
    She is such a genius they immediately gave her a position at the university.

    Such + Noun (This type of...)

    USE


    "Such" can also mean "this type of..." or "that type of..."
    Examples:

    • The archeologist had never seen such writing before he discovered the tablet.


    • this/that type of writing
    • She usually doesn't receive such criticism.
      this/that kind of criticism
    • Frank has never made such mistakes before.
      these/those kinds of mistakes
    • I wish that this will help u.... and if u wanna any other explanation just tell me
    التعديل الأخير تم بواسطة TigerShark ; 05-07-2008 الساعة 03:04 PM

  • #3
    مـشـرف الصورة الرمزية onh1986
    تاريخ التسجيل
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    افتراضي

    تم تعديل عنوان الموضوع

    الجواب الصحيح:
    It was so hot that no one got out of the swimming pool
    so له عدة معانٍ:
    1- إذا جاء بعده صفة فإن يأتي بمعنى "جداً"
    2- إذا سبقه and فإنه يأتي كحرف عطف بمعنى "وبالتالي "
    3- إذا جاء بعده that فإنه يأتي كحرف عطف قبل ضمائر الرفع فقط بمعنى "لكي ، كي"
    4- يأتي كحرف عطف للربط بين جملتين بمعنى "لذا"
    5- إذا أتى في بداية الجملة فإنه غالباً يأتي كحرف عطف بمعنى "إذاً"
    6- يمكن أن يأتي so بدلاً من that في الجمل المنفية
    8- إذا جاء بعده فعل مساعد مباشرة فإنه يأتي كظرف بمعنى "أيضا too".

    وهذه الصفحة تساعدك لمعرفة الفرق بين so و such:
    http://www.englishpage.com/minitutorials/sosuch.html


    أرجوا أن يكون هذا مفيداً
    وإذا كان لديك أسئلة أخرى تتعلق بالموضوع فقط أخبرني
    Omar AL-Hourani
    Express English Forum Administrator


  • #4
    Super Teacher الصورة الرمزية TigerShark
    تاريخ التسجيل
    Mar 2008
    الدولة
    Great EGYPT
    المشاركات
    1,469
    الدولة
    Egypt

    افتراضي

    I think it is very apparent now
    We r waiting 4 more questions
    God bless u

  • #5
    English-Teacher الصورة الرمزية English-Teacher
    تاريخ التسجيل
    May 2008
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    افتراضي

    YOU can say it was very hot or it ws too hot

  • #6
    English-Teacher الصورة الرمزية English-Teacher
    تاريخ التسجيل
    May 2008
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    افتراضي

    A conjunction may be used to indicate the [COLOR=blue! important][COLOR=blue! important]relationship[/COLOR][/COLOR] between the ideas expressed in a clause and the ideas expressed in the rest of a sentence. The conjunctions in the following examples are printed in bold type.
    e.g. We could go to the library, or we could go to the park.
    He neither finished his homework nor studied for the test.
    I went out because the sun was shining.


    1. Coordinate conjunctions
    Coordinate conjunctions are used to join two similar grammatical constructions; for instance, two words, two phrases or two clauses.
    e.g. My friend and I will attend the meeting.
    Austria is famous for the beauty of its landscape and the hospitality of its people.
    The sun rose and the birds began to sing.

    In these examples, the coordinate conjunction and is used to join the two words friend and I, the two phrases the beauty of its landscape and the hospitality of its people, and the two clauses the sun rose and the birds began to sing.

    The most commonly used coordinate conjunctions are and, but and or. In addition, the words nor and yet may be used as coordinate conjunctions. In the following table, each coordinate conjunction is followed by its meaning and an example of its use. Note the use of inverted word order in the clause beginning with nor.


    Coordinate Conjunctions
    and: in addition She tried and succeeded.but: however They tried but did not succeed.or: alternatively Did you go out or stay at home?nor: and neither I did not see it, nor did they.yet: however The sun is warm, yet the air is cool.
    As illustrated above, when a coordinate conjunction joins two verbs which have the same subject, the subject need not be repeated. For instance, in the example she tried and succeeded, the pronoun she acts as the subject for both the verb tried and the verb succeeded. It should also be noted that when a coordinate conjunction joins two verbs which do not have the same subject, the two coordinate clauses may be separated by a comma or semicolon, in order to make the meaning clear.

    See Exercise 1.


    2. Correlative conjunctions
    Correlative conjunctions are used in pairs, in order to show the relationship between the ideas expressed in different parts of a sentence. For instance, in the following example, the expression either ... or is used to indicate that the ideas expressed in the two clauses represent two alternative choices of action.
    e.g. Either you should study harder, or you should take a different course.

    The most commonly used correlative conjunctions are both ... and, either ... or and neither ... nor. In the table below, each pair of correlative conjunctions is accompanied by an example of its use. Note that in the construction if ... then, the word then can usually be omitted.


    Correlative Conjunctions
    both ... andHe is both intelligent and good-natured.either ... orI will either go for a walk or read a book.neither ... norHe is neither rich nor famous.hardly ... whenHe had hardly begun to work, when he was interrupted.if ... thenIf that is true, then what happened is not surprising.no sooner ... thanNo sooner had I reached the corner, than the bus came.not only ... but alsoShe is not only clever, but also hard-working.rather ... thanI would rather go [COLOR=blue! important][COLOR=blue! important]swimming[/COLOR][/COLOR] than go to the library.scarcely ... whenScarcely had we left home, when it started to rain.what with ... andWhat with all her aunts, uncles and cousins, she has many relatives.whether ... orHave you decided whether you will come or not?

    See Exercise 2.


    3. Subordinate conjunctions
    As has been seen in previous chapters, subordinate clauses may begin with relative pronouns such as that, what, whatever, which, who and whom, as well as with words such as how, when, where, wherever and why. In the following examples, the subordinate clauses are underlined.
    e.g. The house, which stood on a hill, could be seen for miles.
    I wonder how he did that.

    In addition, subordinate clauses may also begin with words which are commonly referred to as subordinate conjunctions. In the following examples, the subordinate conjunctions are printed in bold type.
    e.g. Because it was cold, I wore my winter coat.
    Let us wait until the rain stops.

    The subordinate conjunctions below are accompanied by their meanings and examples of use.


    Subordinate ConjunctionsAs
    1. because: As he is my friend, I will help him.
    2. when: We watched as the plane took off.

    After
    1. later in time: After the train left, we went home.

    Although or though
    1. in spite of the fact that: Although it was after midnight, we did not feel tired.

    Before
    1. earlier than: I arrived before the stores were open.

    Because
    1. for the reason that: We had to wait, because we arrived early.

    For
    1. for, because: He is happy, for he enjoys his work.

    If
    1. on condition that: If she is here, we will see her.

    Lest
    1. for fear that: I watched closely, lest he make a mistake.
    Note the use of the Subjunctive Mood in the clause with lest.

    Providing or provided
    1. on condition that: All will be well, providing you are careful.

    Since
    1. from a past time: I have been here since the sun rose.
    2. as, because: Since you are here, you can help me.

    So or so that
    1. consequently: It was raining, so we did not go out.
    2. in order that: I am saving money so I can buy a bicycle.
    Note: When used with the meaning in order that, so is usually followed by that in formal English.
    e.g. I am saving money so that I can buy a bicycle.

    Supposing
    1. if: Supposing that happens, what will you do?

    Than
    1. used in comparisons: He is taller than you are.

    Unless
    1. except when, if not: Unless he helps us, we cannot succeed.

    Until or till
    1. up to the time when: I will wait until I hear from you.

    Whereas
    1. because: Whereas this is a public building, it is open to everyone.
    2. on the other hand: He is short, whereas you are tall.

    Whether
    1. if: I do not know whether she was invited.

    While
    1. at the time when: While it was snowing, we played cards.
    2. on the other hand: He is rich, while his friend is poor.
    3. although: While I am not an expert, I will do my best.

    In addition, the following phrases are often used at the beginning of subordinate clauses.

    As if
    1. in a similar way: She talks as if she knows everything.

    As long as
    1. if: As long as we cooperate, we can finish the work easily.
    2. while: He has lived there as long as I have known him.

    As soon as
    1. immediately when: Write to me as soon as you can.

    As though
    1. in a similar way: It looks as though there will be a storm.

    Even if
    1. in spite of a possibility: I am going out even if it rains.

    In case
    1. because of a possibility: Take a [COLOR=blue! important][COLOR=blue! important]sweater[/COLOR][/COLOR] in case it gets cold.

    Or else
    1. otherwise: Please be careful, or else you may have an [COLOR=blue! important][COLOR=blue! important]accident[/COLOR][/COLOR].

    So as to
    1. in order to: I hurried so as to be on time.


    See Exercise 3.

    Certain words, such as after, before, since and until may function either as prepositions or subordinate conjunctions. However it should be noted that in some cases different words must be used as prepositions and subordinate conjunctions, in order to express similar meanings. This is illustrated in the table below.


    Differing Prepositions and Conjunctions
    MeaningPrepositionConjunction for this reason because of because in spite of this despite although at the time when during while in a similar way like as if
    In the following examples, the objects of the prepositions, and the verbs of the subordinate clauses are underlined.
    Preposition: They were upset because of the delay.
    Conjunction: They were upset because they were delayed.

    Preposition: Despite the rain, we enjoyed ourselves.
    Conjunction: Although it rained, we enjoyed ourselves.

    Preposition: We stayed indoors during the storm.
    Conjunction: We stayed indoors while the storm raged.

    Preposition: It looks like rain.
    Conjunction: It looks as if it will rain.

    In the above examples, it can be seen that the prepositions because of, despite, during and like have the noun objects delay, rain and storm; whereas the subordinate conjunctions because, although, while and as if introduce subordinate clauses containing the verbs were delayed, rained, raged and will rain.

    It should be noted that like is sometimes used as a subordinate conjunction in informal English.
    e.g. It looks like it will rain.
    However, this use of like is considered incorrect in formal English.

    See Exercise 4.


    4. Connecting adverbs
    Connecting adverbs are often used to show the relationship between the ideas expressed in a clause and the ideas expressed in a preceding clause, sentence or paragraph. In the following examples, the connecting adverbs are printed in bold type.
    e.g. I wanted to study; however, I was too tired.
    We knew what to expect. Therefore, we were not surprised at what happened.

    In the first example, the connecting adverb however shows that there is a conflict between the idea expressed in the clause I was too tired and the idea expressed in the preceding clause I wanted to study. In the second example, the connecting adverb therefore shows that there is a cause and effect relationship between the idea expressed in the sentence we knew what to expect, and the clause we were not surprised at what happened.

    Connecting adverbs are similar to conjunctions in that both may be used to introduce clauses. However, the use of connecting adverbs differs from that of conjunctions in the ways indicated below.

    a. Stress and punctuation
    In spoken English, a connecting adverb is usually given more stress than a conjunction. Correspondingly, in formal written English a connecting adverb is usually separated from the rest of a clause by commas, whereas a conjunction is usually not separated from the rest of a clause by commas.

    In addition, in formal written English a clause containing a connecting adverb is often separated from a preceding clause by a semicolon; whereas a clause beginning with a conjunction is usually not separated from a preceding clause by a semicolon.
    e.g. I wanted to study; however, I was too tired.
    I wanted to study, but I was too tired.
    In the first example, the connecting adverb however is preceded by a semicolon, and is separated from I was too tired by a comma. In the second example, the conjunction but is preceded by a comma rather than by a semicolon, and is not separated from I was too tired by a comma.

    It should be noted that when no conjunction is present, a semicolon may be used to connect two main clauses. For example:
    The clouds dispersed; the moon rose.
    In this example, the two main clauses the clouds dispersed and the moon rose are connected by a semicolon rather than by a conjunction.

    b. Connecting adverbs used to connect sentences
    Unlike conjunctions, connecting adverbs may be used in formal English to show the relationship between ideas expressed in separate sentences. For example:
    The wind was strong. Thus, I felt very cold.
    In this example, the connecting adverb thus shows that there is a cause and effect relationship between the ideas expressed by the two sentences the wind was strong and I felt very cold.

    In informal English, coordinate conjunctions are sometimes used to show the relationship between the ideas expressed in separate sentences. For example:
    The wind was strong. And I felt very cold.
    However, this use of coordinate conjunctions is considered to be grammatically incorrect in formal English.

    c. Position in a clause
    A subordinate conjunction must usually be placed at the beginning of a clause. However, as was seen in the discussion on adverbs, a connecting adverb may be placed at the beginning, in the middle, or at the end of a clause. This is illustrated below.
    e.g. His visit was unexpected. Nevertheless, I was pleased to see him.
    His visit was unexpected. I was, nevertheless, pleased to see him.
    His visit was unexpected. I was pleased to see him, nevertheless.

    d. Examples of connecting adverbs
    The following are examples of words which may be used as connecting adverbs. Each connecting adverb is followed by its meaning and an example of its use.


    Connecting Adverbs
    accordingly: so He was very persuasive; accordingly, I did what he asked.also: in addition She is my neighbor; she is also my best friend.besides: in addition I like the job. Besides, I need the money.consequently: so She had a fever; consequently, she stayed at home.furthermore: in addition You should stop smoking. Furthermore, you should do it at once!hence: for that reason He is a good friend. Hence, I was not embarrassed to ask him for help.however: but We wanted to arrive on time; however, we were delayed by traffic.likewise: in addition The region is beautiful. Likewise, the climate is excellent.moreover: in addition She is very intelligent; moreover, she is very ambitious.nevertheless: but They are proud. Nevertheless, I like them.nonetheless: but The ascent was dangerous. Nonetheless, he decided to attempt it.otherwise: if not, or else We should consult them; otherwise, they may be upset.still: but It is a long way to the beach. Still, it is a fine day to go swimming.then: 1. next, afterwards We went shopping, then we had lunch. 2. so If you are sure, then I must believe you.therefore: for that reason I was nervous; therefore, I could not do my best.thus: so, in this way He travelled as quickly as possible. Thus, he reached Boston the next day.
    As indicated in the following table, several connecting adverbs have meanings similar to those of the conjunctions and, but or so.


    Connecting Adverbs with meanings similar to And, But and So
    Similar to AndSimilar to ButSimilar to So also however accordingly besides nevertheless consequently furthermore nonetheless hence likewise still therefore moreover thus
    See Exercises 5 and 6.


    5. Parallel construction
    The repetition of a particular grammatical construction is often referred to as parallel construction. This is illustrated in the following examples.
    e.g. I am neither angry nor excited.
    The resort contains tennis courts, swimming pools and a snack bar.
    In the first example, the two phrases neither angry and nor excited exhibit parallel construction. In the second example, the three phrases tennis courts, swimming pools and a snack bar exhibit parallel construction.

    In English, it is considered preferable to use parallel construction whenever parallel ideas are expressed.

    Thus, whenever possible, parallel construction should be employed when correlative conjunctions are used. In the following example, the correlative conjunctions are printed in bold type.
    e.g. Incorrect: He has both a good education, and he has good work habits.
    Corrected: He has both a good education and good work habits.
    The first sentence is incorrect, since both and and are followed by different grammatical constructions. Both is followed by the phrase a good education; whereas and is followed by the clause he has good work habits. The second sentence has been corrected by changing the clause he has good work habits into the phrase good work habits.

    The following example illustrates the use of parallel construction with the correlative conjunctions neither ... nor.
    e.g. Incorrect: She turned neither right nor to the left.
    Corrected: She turned neither right nor left.
    or Corrected: She turned neither to the right nor to the left.
    The first sentence is incorrect, since neither is followed by a single word; whereas nor is followed by a prepositional phrase. The second sentence has been corrected by changing the phrase to the left to the word left. Alternatively, as shown in the third sentence, two prepositional phrases can be used.

    See Exercise 7.

    Parallel construction should also be used when listing a series of ideas. For example:
    Incorrect: The hotel is charming, well-situated and is not expensive.
    Corrected: The hotel is charming, well-situated and inexpensive.
    The first sentence is incorrect, since the first two items in the series, charming and well-situated, are adjectives, whereas the last item, is not expensive, contains a verb. The second sentence has been corrected by changing is not expensive to the adjective inexpensive.

    The following is another example of the use of parallel construction when listing a series of ideas.
    e.g. Incorrect: I like to ski, skating and swimming.
    Corrected: I like skiing, skating and swimming.
    The first sentence is incorrect, since the first item in the series, to ski, is an infinitive, whereas the second and third items, skating and swimming, are gerunds. The second sentence has been corrected by changing the infinitive to ski to the gerund skiing.

    (See Exercise 8. ( coppied from other site just for benefit

  • #7
    Teacher الصورة الرمزية evil
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    افتراضي

    جزاكم الله الف خير !!!

    وان شاء الله يكون في ميزان حسناتكم !!!

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