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الموضوع: i need some help

  1. #1
    طالب مبتدئ الصورة الرمزية miroon
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    New3 i need some help

    بسم الله الرحمن الرحيم

    أخواني الرجاء أطلب منكم بعض المساعدة عندي أمتحان في اللغة الأنجليزية في
    الpoetry زي مانتو شايفين كلها قصيدة وتحليل وأني لسة بالسنة الاولى
    ياريت تساعدوني ولا أنسى من دعائكم


    القصيدة أسمها :

    To Autumn by John Keats
    والثانية أسمها
    My Heart Leaps Up by words worth
    أبغى أعرف وش القصيدة معنا والثيم والرموز فيها
    ياريت تساعدوني فيهم ولكم جزيل الشكر


  • #2
    Kingdom Of Heaven الصورة الرمزية aiman.h.kallaf
    تاريخ التسجيل
    Feb 2009
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    افتراضي

    help me please...help me please

    help me please...help me please

    am in hurry please come in

    شباب ممكن دقيقة من فضلك

    all those whom already answer you have put some effort searching for the answer

    it's time that you start depending on your self

    don't expect every time you come near the exam time to get the solution and leave



    wish if i can do like this with math or physics





  • #3
    ジライヤ様 الصورة الرمزية turki 2000
    تاريخ التسجيل
    Jul 2008
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    افتراضي

    اقتباس المشاركة الأصلية كتبت بواسطة aiman.h.kallaf مشاهدة المشاركة
    help me please...help me please

    help me please...help me please

    am in hurry please come in

    شباب ممكن دقيقة من فضلك

    all those whom already answer you have put some effort searching for the answer

    it's time that you start depending on your self

    don't expect every time you come near the exam time to get the solution and leave



    wish if i can do like this with math or physics

    اتفق معآك عزيزي أيمن
    والله يوفقك ياأيمن في اختبآرآتك >> أعتقد إنك تكره الفيرزيآء والريآضيات

    وبالنسبة لك ايا miroon لو بيدي شيء صدقني بآسآعدك ولكن تخصصي بعيد عن الأدب الإنجليزي
    ولكن الله يوفقك وييسر لك


    ジライヤ様

    Welcome any time ,, guys



  • #4
    أرجــــو الثبآآآت .. الصورة الرمزية Cupcake
    تاريخ التسجيل
    Dec 2008
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    افتراضي

    Analysis Of John Keats "To Autumn"

    ...change of seasons. He was apparently inspired by observing nature; his detailed description of natural occurrences has a pleasant appeal to the readers' senses. Keats also alludes to a certain unpleasantness connected to Autumn, and links it to a time of death. However, Keats' association between stages of Autumn and the process of dying does not take away from the "ode" effect of the poem.



    The three-stanza poem seems to create three distinct stages of Autumn: growth, harvest, and death. The theme going in the first stanza is that Autumn is a season of fulfilling, yet the theme ending the final stanza is that Autumn is a season of dying. However, by using the stages of Autumn's as a metaphor for the process of death, Keats puts the concept of death in a different, more favorable light.



    In the first stanza, the "growth" stanza, Keats appeals to our sense of visualization. The reader pictures a country setting, such as a cottage with a yard ...
    Like the "Ode on Melancholy," "To Autumn" is written in a three-stanza structure with a variable rhyme scheme. Each stanza is eleven lines long (as opposed to ten in "Melancholy", and each is metered in a relatively precise iambic pentameter. In terms of both thematic organization and rhyme scheme, each stanza is divided roughly into two parts. In each stanza, the first part is made up of the first four lines of the stanza, and the second part is made up of the last seven lines. The first part of each stanza follows an ABAB rhyme scheme, the first line rhyming with the third, and the second line rhyming with the fourth. The second part of each stanza is longer and varies in rhyme scheme: The first stanza is arranged CDEDCCE, and the second and third stanzas are arranged CDECDDE. (Thematically, the first part of each stanza serves to define the subject of the stanza, and the second part... x

    المواقع ذي تعطي مقالات و تحليلات رائعه بس هنا لاهنتي بطاقتك الاتمانيه لازم تكون جاهزه على الاقل جبت لك الجزئيه الفري عندهم,,,,

    http://www.peerpapers.com/essays/Ana...359.html?topic

    _________________________________________________

    This is another free complete analysis (very simple) x


    Analysis and commentary of To Autumn by John Keats

    In �To Autumn�, a superficial reading would suggest that John Keats writes about a typical day of this season, describing all kind of colourful and detailed images. But before commenting on the meaning of the poem, I will briefly talk about its structure, its type and its rhyme.
    The poem is an ode[1] that contains three stanzas, and each of these has eleven lines. With respect to its rhyme, �To Autumn� does not follow a perfect pattern. While the first stanza has an ABABCDEDCCE pattern (see the poem on the next page), the second and the third ones have an ABABCDECDDE pattern. However, it is important to say that a poetic license appears in the third stanza. The word �wind� (line 15) is pronounced [waind] to rhyme with �find�.
    With regard to the meaning of the poem, as I said above, the author makes an intense description of autumn at least at first sight. The first stanza begins showing this season as misty and fruitful, which, with the help of a �maturing sun�, ripens the fruit of the vines. Next, we can see clearly a hyperbole[2]. Keats writes that a tree has so many apples that it bends (line 5), while the gourds swell and the hazel shells plumps. Finally, Keats suggests that the bees have a large amount of flowers. And these flowers did not bud in summer but now, in autumn. As a consequence, the bees are incessantly working and their honeycombs are overflowing since summer.
    In the second stanza, there is an evident personification[3]. The poet starts asking a rhetoric question (line 12) to autumn which now is not only a woman but a gleaner. However, this woman is apparently resting in a granary or in the landscape:

    �Or on a half-reaped furrow sound asleep,
    Drowsed with the fume of poppies��

    As she is not working with her hook, some flowers, that were going to be cut, remain untouchable (lines 17 and 18). Also we can see an image of her hair gently moving. The stanza ends with autumn patiently watching the �last oozings� of cider.
    The third stanza continues again with rhetoric questions. In the first one Keats asks the woman where the sounds of the spring are. And the second one is just a repetition of the same question. However, the poet tells autumn that she has her own sounds, although some of them are sad:

    �Then in a wailful choir the small gnats mourn�

    On the contrary, the �full-grown lambs� bleat loudly, the crickets sing, a red-breast whistles, and swallows warble in the sky. Keats also describes a day that is dying, ending, and, as a consequence, is getting rose (lines 25 and 26). The last lines of this stanza consist of a combination of the autumn sounds, of the animal sounds (lines from 30 to 33) as I said before few lines above.
    To conclude, although my first impression was that John Keats was simply describing the main characteristics of autumn, and the human and animal activities related to it, a deeper reading could suggest that Keats talks about the process of life. Autumn symbolises maturity in human and animal lives. Some instances of this are the �full-grown lambs�, the sorrow of the gnats, the wind that lives and dies, and the day that is dying and getting dark. As all we know, the next season is winter, a part of the year that represents aging and death, in other words, the end of life. However, in my opinion, death does not have a negative connotation because Keats enjoys and accepts �autumn� or
    maturity

    http://www.eliteskills.com/analysis_...s_analysis.php

    __________________________________________

    This analysis is from sparkNotes

    http://www.sparknotes.com/poetry/keats

    Table of Contents
    Context

    Themes, Motifs & Symbols
    Summary and Analysis
    Ode on Indolence
    Ode to Psyche
    Ode to a Nightingale
    Ode on a Grecian Urn
    Ode on Melancholy
    To Autumn

    العمر فانـي ولاشكّ تدرون .... !


    لابد أصير بــيوم \ ذكرى .. قديمه \


    تكفون .. لآمن غبت يا ناس تدعــون ..


    \ يا رب ... ترزقها .... الجنان ...العظيمة \

    *********************
    اللهم أجعل قبر جدي روضة من رياض الجنة

    دعواتكم لأمي بالشفاء ...

  • #5
    أرجــــو الثبآآآت .. الصورة الرمزية Cupcake
    تاريخ التسجيل
    Dec 2008
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    افتراضي

    Wordsworth’s Poetry

    طبعاً الشاعر يتميز بطابع معين في قصائده وهذة اهم مميزات شعره

    Themes

    The Beneficial Influence of Nature

    Throughout Wordsworth’s work, nature provides the ultimate good influence on the human mind. All manifestations of the natural world—from the highest mountain to the simplest flower—elicit noble, elevated thoughts and passionate emotions in the people who observe these manifestations. Wordsworth repeatedly emphasizes the importance of nature to an individual’s intellectual and spiritual development. A good relationship with nature helps individuals connect to both the spiritual and the social worlds. As Wordsworth explains in The Prelude, a love of nature can lead to a love of humankind. In such poems as “The World Is Too Much with Us” (1807) and “London, 1802” (1807) people become selfish and immoral when they distance themselves from nature by living in cities. Humanity’s innate empathy and nobility of spirit becomes corrupted by artificial social conventions as well as by the squalor of city life. In contrast, people who spend a lot of time in nature, such as laborers and farmers, retain the purity and nobility of their souls.
    The Power of the Human Mind


    Wordsworth praised the power of the human mind. Using memory and imagination, individuals could overcome difficulty and pain. For instance, the speaker in “Lines Composed a Few Miles Above Tintern Abbey” (1798) relieves his loneliness with memories of nature, while the leech gatherer in “Resolution and Independence” (1807) perseveres cheerfully in the face of poverty by the exertion of his own will. The transformative powers of the mind are available to all, regardless of an individual’s class or background. This democratic view emphasizes individuality and uniqueness. Throughout his work, Wordsworth showed strong support for the political, religious, and artistic rights of the individual, including the power of his or her mind. In the 1802 preface to Lyrical Ballads, Wordsworth explained the relationship between the mind and poetry. Poetry is “emotion recollected in tranquility”—that is, the mind transforms the raw emotion of experience into poetry capable of giving pleasure. Later poems, such as “Ode: Intimations of Immortality” (1807), imagine nature as the source of the inspiring material that nourishes the active, creative mind.
    The Splendor of Childhood

    In Wordsworth’s poetry, childhood is a magical, magnificent time of innocence. Children form an intense bond with nature, so much so that they appear to be a part of the natural world, rather than a part of the human, social world. Their relationship to nature is passionate and extreme: children feel joy at seeing a rainbow but great terror at seeing desolation or decay. In 1799, Wordsworth wrote several poems about a girl named Lucy who died at a young age. These poems, including “She dwelt among the untrodden ways” (1800) and “Strange fits of passion have I known” (1800), praise her beauty and lament her untimely death. In death, Lucy retains the innocence and splendor of childhood, unlike the children who grow up, lose their connection to nature, and lead unfulfilling lives. The speaker in “Ode: Intimations of Immortality” believes that children delight in nature because they have access to a divine, immortal world. As children age and reach maturity, they lose this connection but gain an ability to feel emotions, both good and bad. Through the power of the human mind, particularly memory, adults can recollect the devoted connection to nature of their youth.
    Motifs

    Wandering and Wanderers

    The speakers of Wordsworth’s poems are inveterate wanderers: they roam solitarily, they travel over the moors, they take private walks through the highlands of Scotland. Active wandering allows the characters to experience and participate in the vastness and beauty of the natural world. Moving from place to place also allows the wanderer to make discoveries about himself. In “I travelled among unknown men” (1807), the speaker discovers his patriotism only after he has traveled far from England. While wandering, speakers uncover the visionary powers of the mind and understand the influence of nature, as in “I wandered lonely as a cloud” (1807). The speaker of this poem takes comfort in a walk he once took after he has returned to the grit and desolation of city life. Recollecting his wanderings allows him to transcend his present circumstances. Wordsworth’s poetry itself often wanders, roaming from one subject or experience to another, as in The Prelude. In this long poem, the speaker moves from idea to idea through digressions and distractions that mimic the natural progression of thought within the mind.
    Memory

    Memory allows Wordsworth’s speakers to overcome the harshness of the contemporary world. Recollecting their childhoods gives adults a chance to reconnect with the visionary power and intense relationship they had with nature as children. In turn, these memories encourage adults to re-cultivate as close a relationship with nature as possible as an antidote to sadness, loneliness, and despair. The act of remembering also allows the poet to write: Wordsworth argued in the 1802 preface to Lyrical Ballads that poetry sprang from the calm remembrance of passionate emotional experiences. Poems cannot be composed at the moment when emotion is first experienced. Instead, the initial emotion must be combined with other thoughts and feelings from the poet’s past experiences using memory and imagination. The poem produced by this time-consuming process will allow the poet to convey the essence of his emotional memory to his readers and will permit the readers to remember similar emotional experiences of their own.
    Vision and Sight

    Throughout his poems, Wordsworth fixates on vision and sight as the vehicles through which individuals are transformed. As speakers move through the world, they see visions of great natural loveliness, which they capture in their memories. Later, in moments of darkness, the speakers recollect these visions, as in “I wandered lonely as a cloud.” Here, the speaker daydreams of former jaunts through nature, which “flash upon that inward eye / which is the bliss of solitude” (21–22). The power of sight captured by our mind’s eye enables us to find comfort even in our darkest, loneliest moments. Elsewhere, Wordsworth describes the connection between seeing and experiencing emotion, as in “My heart leaps up” (1807), in which the speaker feels joy as a result of spying a rainbow across the sky. Detailed images of natural beauty abound in Wordsworth’s poems, including descriptions of daffodils and clouds, which focus on what can be seen, rather than touched, heard, or felt. In Book Fourteenth of The Prelude, climbing to the top of a mountain in Wales allows the speaker to have a prophetic vision of the workings of the mind as it thinks, reasons, and feels.
    Symbols

    Light


    Light often symbolizes truth and knowledge. In “The Tables Turned” (1798), Wordsworth contrasts the barren light of reason available in books with the “sweet” (11) and “freshening” (6) light of the knowledge nature brings. Sunlight literally helps people see, and sunlight also helps speakers and characters begin to glimpse the wonders of the world. In “Expostulation and Reply” (1798), the presence of light, or knowledge, within an individual prevents dullness and helps the individual to see, or experience. Generally, the light in Wordsworth’s poems represents immortal truths that can’t be entirely grasped by human reason. In “Ode: Imitations of Immortality,” the speaker remembers looking at a meadow as a child and imagining it gleaming in “celestial light” (4). As the speaker grows and matures, the light of his youth fades into the “light of common day” (78) of adulthood. But the speaker also imagines his remembrances of the past as a kind of light, which illuminate his soul and give him the strength to live.
    The Leech Gatherer

    In “Resolution and Independence,” the ancient leech gatherer who spends his days wandering the moors looking for leeches represents the strong-minded poet who perseveres in the face of poverty, obscurity, and solitude. As the poem begins, a wanderer travels along a moor, feeling elated and taking great pleasure in the sights of nature around him but also remembering that despair is the twin of happiness. Eventually he comes upon an old man looking for leeches, even though the work is dangerous and the leeches have become increasingly hard to find. As the speaker chats with the old man, he realizes the similarities between leech gathering and writing poetry. Like a leech gather, a poet continues to search his or her mind and the landscape of the natural world for poems, even though such intense emotions can damage one’s psyche, the work pays poorly and poverty is dangerous to one’s health, and inspiration sometimes seems increasingly hard to find. The speaker resolves to think of the leech gatherer whenever his enthusiasm for poetry or belief in himself begins to wane.
    العمر فانـي ولاشكّ تدرون .... !


    لابد أصير بــيوم \ ذكرى .. قديمه \


    تكفون .. لآمن غبت يا ناس تدعــون ..


    \ يا رب ... ترزقها .... الجنان ...العظيمة \

    *********************
    اللهم أجعل قبر جدي روضة من رياض الجنة

    دعواتكم لأمي بالشفاء ...

  • #6
    أرجــــو الثبآآآت .. الصورة الرمزية Cupcake
    تاريخ التسجيل
    Dec 2008
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    افتراضي

    Summary and Analysis of "My heart leaps up when I behold"

    In this very short poem consisting of only 9 lines, the speaker begins by declaring that he is moved by nature, and especially by nature's beauty: "My heart leaps up when I behold / A Rainbow in the sky." He goes on to say that he has always felt the impact of nature, even when he was an infant: "So was it when my life began; / So is it now I am a man." The speaker is so certain of his connection with nature that he says it will be constant until he becomes an old man, or else he would rather die: "So be it when I shall grow old, / Or let me die!" In the next line he declares that children are superior to men because of their proximity to nature: "The Child is father of the Man." For this reason, he wishes to bind himself to his childhood self: "And I could wish my days to be / Bound each to each by natural piety."

    Analysis


    Written on March 26, 1802 and published in 1807 as an epigraph to "Ode: Intimations of Immortality," this poem addresses the same themes found in "Tintern Abbey" and "Ode; Intimations of Immortality," albeit in a much more concise way. The speaker explains his connection to nature, stating that it has been strong throughout his life. He even goes so far as to say that if he ever loses his connection he would prefer to die.
    The seventh line of the poem is the key line: "The Child is father of the Man." This line is often quoted because of its ability to express a complicated idea in so few words. The speaker believes (as explained in more detail in "Tintern Abbey") that children are closer to heaven and God, and through God, nature, because they have recently come from the arms of God. The speaker understands the importance of staying connected to one's own childhood, stating: "I could wish my days to be / Bound each to each by natural piety."
    Wordsworth chooses the word "piety" to express the bond he wishes to attain (and maintain) with his childhood self, because it best emphasizes the importance of the bond. His readers would have been accustomed to the idea of piety in the religious sense, and would thus have been able to translate the meaning behind the word to an understanding of the power of the bond Wordsworth hopes to attain.
    The format of "My heart leaps up when I behold" gives the poem a somewhat staccato feeling and forces the reader to pause at important points in the poem. For instance, the two short lines of the poem are both quite significant. First, "A rainbow in the sky" harkens back to God's promise to Noah signifying their bond, and foreshadows the speaker's wish to be "Bound...by natural piety." The sixth line, "Or let me die!" shows the strength of the speaker's convictions.
    العمر فانـي ولاشكّ تدرون .... !


    لابد أصير بــيوم \ ذكرى .. قديمه \


    تكفون .. لآمن غبت يا ناس تدعــون ..


    \ يا رب ... ترزقها .... الجنان ...العظيمة \

    *********************
    اللهم أجعل قبر جدي روضة من رياض الجنة

    دعواتكم لأمي بالشفاء ...

  • #7
    أرجــــو الثبآآآت .. الصورة الرمزية Cupcake
    تاريخ التسجيل
    Dec 2008
    الدولة
    KSA
    المشاركات
    1,141
    الدولة
    Saudi Arabia

    افتراضي

    غاليتي ,,, الجهد الاول والاخير يقع عليك ,,

    لذلك نبحث لك ولكن عليك ان تقرائي اولاً ثم ان تفهمي المحتوى ثانياً ,,

    بالتوفيق
    العمر فانـي ولاشكّ تدرون .... !


    لابد أصير بــيوم \ ذكرى .. قديمه \


    تكفون .. لآمن غبت يا ناس تدعــون ..


    \ يا رب ... ترزقها .... الجنان ...العظيمة \

    *********************
    اللهم أجعل قبر جدي روضة من رياض الجنة

    دعواتكم لأمي بالشفاء ...

  • #8
    طالب مبتدئ الصورة الرمزية mom-mylife
    تاريخ التسجيل
    Nov 2013
    المشاركات
    32
    الدولة
    Iraq

    افتراضي

    بالتوفيق اختي وان شاء الله يكون سهل عليج واكو مواقع خاصة ب poetry تقدرين تستفادين منها
    Everyone makes mistakes in life, but that doesn't mean
    they have to pay for them for the rest of their lives.

    Sometimes good people make bad choices but that
    doesn't mean they're bad people.



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